Inspirational Short Stories

Latest Inspirational Short Stories News

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An Inspirational New Series "SMALL MIRACLES," Based on the Best-selling
During that time the SMALL MIRACLES team produced 4 episodes of the series, each episode as diverse as the next, based on four short stories that were carefully chosen from the nearly 400 true stories available in the Small Miracles book series. Each …
Read more on DigitalJournal.com

After the applause: A wrap up from the SCLC Performing Arts Festival
Last week's annual Sapphire Coast Learning Community (SCLC) performing arts festival was nothing short of inspirational and has left all those involved feeling elated, if not a little exhausted. Coordinator SCLC performing arts festival organising …
Read more on Merimbula News Weekly

Bob on the Box: TV highlights
From inspirational stories on local celebrities and rendezvous with gorgeous girls, to adrenaline sports, hi-tech gadgets, dude food, fashion trends, fitness tips and first-hand reviews of cars – both ultramodern and classic – The Man Cave will give …
Read more on Artslink.co.za News (press release)

Happiness Chronicles: Short Stories and Recipes for a Happy Life

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Happiness Chronicles: Short Stories and Recipes for a Happy Life

Happiness Chronicles: Short Stories and Recipes for a Happy Life

I was reading this book, The Master Key System by Charles F. Haanel, a turn of the century ‘New Thought’ writer. What’s now a complete book, in 1916, it was broken up into twenty-four subsets or periodicals. It has action steps at the end of each subset on how to unlock the law of attraction and change your life forever.

Approximately two years after reading a passage from Frederick Elias Andrews in The Master Key System, I set out to find seven like-minded writing partners

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Taste BerriesTM for Teens : Inspirational Short Stories and Encouragement on...

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End Date: Thursday Oct-23-2014 7:56:35 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $1.85
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Thank God I...Volume 3: Short STories of Inspiration for Every Situation
$7.21
End Date: Monday Oct-27-2014 13:14:37 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $7.21
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Home Improvement (A Pajaro Bay Short Story)

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Home Improvement (A Pajaro Bay Short Story)

Home Improvement (A Pajaro Bay Short Story)

Second Edition: Now with a new cover and a free sneak preview of The Honeymoon Cottage.

From the bestselling Pajaro Bay series comes a little stand-alone short story meant to brighten your day.

Kimberly Bishop married her soul mate. Then he died. Now she’s a 27-year-old widow with a broken-down cottage, a bunch of crazy friends–and a big hole in her heart. But maybe a second chance at love is right under her nose….

The Pajaro Bay novels have

Price:

Happiness Chronicles: Short Stories and Recipes for a Happy Life

Happiness Chronicles: Short Stories and Recipes for a Happy Life

I was reading this book, The Master Key System by Charles F. Haanel, a turn of the century ‘New Thought’ writer. What’s now a complete book, in 1916, it was broken up into twenty-four subsets or periodicals. It has action steps at the end of each subset on how to unlock the law of attraction and change your life forever.

Approximately two years after reading a passage from Frederick Elias Andrews in The Master Key System, I set out to find seven like-minded writing partners

Price:

More Inspirational Short Stories Products

Cancer sufferers' inspirational love story mirrors hit Hollywood movie The

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Cancer sufferers' inspirational love story mirrors hit Hollywood movie The
“I've been through so much in life that I now seize the day – life's too short and I, more than most, know that.” Lucy's life changed on August 22, 2005. The normally healthy 14-year-old was struck down by terrible headaches, flu symptoms and a sky …
Read more on Mirror.co.uk

Best Fourth of July movies
This 2001 satire of comedies like Meatballs is a riotous blend of slapstick, social commentary and heady wordplay from the minds that created MTVs short-lived sketch comedy show The State in the 1990s. The cast is oddball, but somehow perfect … The …
Read more on 225 Baton Rouge

Cool Inspirational Short Stories images

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Check out these inspirational short stories images:

In My Bag
inspirational short stories

Image by shawdm
There was Roo and Ian, then Holly was the final straw. Here’s what I pack into my laptop bag for overseas travel. :-P

Have a good trip all of you. :-)

U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program – Team Roping – 10 May 2008 – Las Cruces – New Mexico – FMWRC
inspirational short stories

Image by familymwr

www.armymwr.com

Cowboy-Soldier Launches Army’s Wounded Warrior Sports Program

Photos and story by Tim Hipps, FMWRC Public Affairs (cleared for public release)

LAS CRUCES, N.M.—Purple Heart recipient Spc. Jake Lowery officially launched the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program with an inspirational team-roping performance at Denny Calhoun Arena on May 10–11.

Lowery, 26, of Fort Richardson, Alaska, lost his right eye and sustained massive head injuries when he was hit by an improvised explosive device that killed a fellow Soldier in Fallujah, Iraq, on Feb. 11, 2007.

Less than a year later, Lowery, a lifelong cowboy, was back aboard a horse and roping steers despite suffering from a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

"This pretty much keeps me going—it’s the only thing that does," he said. "Without it, I’d just be hanging out in my room somewhere."

The Wounded Warrior Sports Program was designed to give active-duty Soldiers with life-altering injuries an opportunity to compete in sporting events by paying for their athletic attire, registration fees, transportation, lodging and per diem.

Lowery travelled from Alaska to El Paso, Texas, and connected with family for a ride home to Silver City, N.M., where he, stepfather John Escobedo and grandfather Pete Escobedo loaded a trailer with horses and drove to Las Cruces for a weekend of roping.

All three competed in the Troy Shelley Affiliate event.

"This is one of the best things the Armed Forces could have done because it’s just therapy for these guys who feel like ‘I lost this. I lost that,’" said Sgt. 1st Class (ret.) Pete Escobedo, 83, who served 27 years in the Army. "If you really want to do something with yourself…Jacob is a prime example. He’s really trying.

"We’re thankful for the Army for doing everything it can for him."

Lowery teamed with different partners to successfully rope two of six steers in the first round of competition on Saturday. After roping two more in the second round and another in the third, he was sitting in third place entering the final short round. But when prize money came into play, his steer got away.

"It looked good to me," Lowery said of his final toss. "I’m not sure how he got out of it. I guess it happens that way sometimes, especially in this sport. Maybe I roped him a little too low. If not, I don’t know."

Despite struggling with limited depth perception, Lowery is encouraged that his roping skills will continue to improve. He already bounced back to win an all-around crown in Alaska and teamed with his stepfather to capture the team-roping title at the Professional Armed Forces Rodeo Association’s 2007 World Finals in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I’m not back to where I was, by any means," Lowery said. "I just keep practicing and hope it eventually comes back."
Lowery’s first run of 8.43 seconds was one of the fastest of the morning among 450 cowboys in Las Cruces. He posted another quality time of 8.69.

"Yeah, it was good, but it could have been better," he said of the full day of roping. "It was awesome just to come down and get out of the cold weather for awhile. I really enjoyed it."

Pete has faith that Jake eventually will overcome TBI and PTSD. Putting him on a horse is the best therapy he knows.

"I have been roping with Jacob since he was knee high to a grasshopper," granddad said. "I just don’t have words to explain the love that we have for Jacob and how much we enjoy ourselves doing what we do. He’s worked very hard. I’m sorry that he had to be injured the way that he was, but we’re doing the best that we can.

"He has taken his injury and forgotten it, to a degree, while he is doing what he loves the most. If you go to our house, this is all you’ll find: horses and cattle. If we’re not roping today, we’re roping tomorrow."

On this weekend, they were roping both days—three generations of cowboys taking turns roping steers in 100-degree desert heat.

"Jake has done remarkably well in coping with his injury," Pete said. "Instead of saying: ‘Well, I’m injured,’ he says: ‘I’m going to do what I can. The Good Lord handed me this hand, so I’m going to do with what he dealt me the best that I can.’"

John, too, is proud of how Jake has dealt with adversity, but he’s also experienced the aftereffects firsthand.

"Sometimes he gets those debilitating headaches and they just knock him smooth out," John said. "And then he just doesn’t feel like doing anything. And if he does feel like it, his head is hurting so bad that he’s not able to.

"There’s a lot of stuff in your head after you go to war and get blown up that you just can’t throw away. Me, I don’t have a clue because I’ve never been, but I can just imagine. A good friend of mine was a Navy SEAL in Vietnam and he got blown up big-time, and the guy’s got the best attitude of anybody I ever met.

"Jake wasn’t hit for ten minutes and he was on the phone asking: ‘What can I do?’" John said. "We got him cycled through (the recovery process) and once he started getting right, he called me up and said: ‘It’s not the events in your life that matter; it’s what you do with those events. If you want to lie around and be a crybaby, be a crybaby. If you want to jump up and do something…’"
That call made John proud.

"I told him before he left: ‘When you sign (enlistment papers with the Army), I can’t come and get you.’ And he said: ‘I ain’t worried.’ He’s never regretted his decision to go, not at all. He’s never got on the ‘Poor me, I wish I hadn’t’ and stuff like that. We hand him a lot and don’t give him the opportunity to lie around and have his own personal pity party. It’s like: ‘Hey, get up, let’s go do something.’"
Then another curious moment comes along.

"At to the world finals last year, he was sitting up at the top of the coliseum by himself," John recalled. "He just couldn’t stand the confinement of having people all around him. It’s just the little things, like he’ll forget to shut the gate (after riding the horse through)."

The affects also can be seen in Jake’s prolonged moments of silence.

"If we can ever get him to where he’ll just start talking again and intermingling with people and not being paranoid, I think life will be good," John said. "When he’s on horseback or working out, he’s a normal guy. But we’ll be sitting at the house watching TV or something and it ain’t the same guy. We drove six- or seven-hundred miles to the world finals—14 hours of drive time—and he probably said three words.

"But you stick him on a horse or in the gym, where his comfort zone is, and he’s fine."

At age 83, Pete derives inspiration from his injured grandson.
"His motivation is the love for this sport, and that keeps him wanting to get better instead of finding excuses as to why he can’t do something," he said. "He’s finding ways and reasons to do whatever he can. We really don’t worry too much about him, especially when we see how he’s progressing and conducting himself with his injury. He’s just not letting it get him down."

Jake believes that sets him apart from some of his fellow injured troops, whom he says "don’t seem to want to do anything." He couldn’t wait to get active again.

"Some of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation people told me about it when I was at the Warrior Transition Unit," Lowery said of the Wounded Warrior Sports Program. "About two days later, I sent in the paperwork. I sent them about four or five events they could pick from."

"This was the perfect venue for this particular guy," said Army sports specialist Mark Dunivan, who expects more applicants to follow. "I have been contacted by an amputee who wants to run in the USA Triathlon Physically Challenged National Championships in New York in July. I think it’s just a matter of getting the word out a little bit more."

Instructions for the application process to participate in the Wounded Warrior Sports Program are available at www.ArmyMWR.com. For more details, contact Dunivan at mark.dunivan@us.army.mil or 719-526-3908 or Peggy Hutchinson at peggy.hutchinson@us.army.mil or 703-681-7211.

To learn more about the Wounded Warrior Program, visit the U.S. Army online at: www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program – Team Roping – 10 May 2008 – Las Cruces – New Mexico – FMWRC
inspirational short stories

Image by familymwr

www.armymwr.com

Cowboy-Soldier Launches Army’s Wounded Warrior Sports Program

Photos and story by Tim Hipps, FMWRC Public Affairs (cleared for public release)

LAS CRUCES, N.M.—Purple Heart recipient Spc. Jake Lowery officially launched the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program with an inspirational team-roping performance at Denny Calhoun Arena on May 10–11.

Lowery, 26, of Fort Richardson, Alaska, lost his right eye and sustained massive head injuries when he was hit by an improvised explosive device that killed a fellow Soldier in Fallujah, Iraq, on Feb. 11, 2007.

Less than a year later, Lowery, a lifelong cowboy, was back aboard a horse and roping steers despite suffering from a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

"This pretty much keeps me going—it’s the only thing that does," he said. "Without it, I’d just be hanging out in my room somewhere."

The Wounded Warrior Sports Program was designed to give active-duty Soldiers with life-altering injuries an opportunity to compete in sporting events by paying for their athletic attire, registration fees, transportation, lodging and per diem.

Lowery travelled from Alaska to El Paso, Texas, and connected with family for a ride home to Silver City, N.M., where he, stepfather John Escobedo and grandfather Pete Escobedo loaded a trailer with horses and drove to Las Cruces for a weekend of roping.

All three competed in the Troy Shelley Affiliate event.

"This is one of the best things the Armed Forces could have done because it’s just therapy for these guys who feel like ‘I lost this. I lost that,’" said Sgt. 1st Class (ret.) Pete Escobedo, 83, who served 27 years in the Army. "If you really want to do something with yourself…Jacob is a prime example. He’s really trying.

"We’re thankful for the Army for doing everything it can for him."

Lowery teamed with different partners to successfully rope two of six steers in the first round of competition on Saturday. After roping two more in the second round and another in the third, he was sitting in third place entering the final short round. But when prize money came into play, his steer got away.

"It looked good to me," Lowery said of his final toss. "I’m not sure how he got out of it. I guess it happens that way sometimes, especially in this sport. Maybe I roped him a little too low. If not, I don’t know."

Despite struggling with limited depth perception, Lowery is encouraged that his roping skills will continue to improve. He already bounced back to win an all-around crown in Alaska and teamed with his stepfather to capture the team-roping title at the Professional Armed Forces Rodeo Association’s 2007 World Finals in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I’m not back to where I was, by any means," Lowery said. "I just keep practicing and hope it eventually comes back."
Lowery’s first run of 8.43 seconds was one of the fastest of the morning among 450 cowboys in Las Cruces. He posted another quality time of 8.69.

"Yeah, it was good, but it could have been better," he said of the full day of roping. "It was awesome just to come down and get out of the cold weather for awhile. I really enjoyed it."

Pete has faith that Jake eventually will overcome TBI and PTSD. Putting him on a horse is the best therapy he knows.

"I have been roping with Jacob since he was knee high to a grasshopper," granddad said. "I just don’t have words to explain the love that we have for Jacob and how much we enjoy ourselves doing what we do. He’s worked very hard. I’m sorry that he had to be injured the way that he was, but we’re doing the best that we can.

"He has taken his injury and forgotten it, to a degree, while he is doing what he loves the most. If you go to our house, this is all you’ll find: horses and cattle. If we’re not roping today, we’re roping tomorrow."

On this weekend, they were roping both days—three generations of cowboys taking turns roping steers in 100-degree desert heat.

"Jake has done remarkably well in coping with his injury," Pete said. "Instead of saying: ‘Well, I’m injured,’ he says: ‘I’m going to do what I can. The Good Lord handed me this hand, so I’m going to do with what he dealt me the best that I can.’"

John, too, is proud of how Jake has dealt with adversity, but he’s also experienced the aftereffects firsthand.

"Sometimes he gets those debilitating headaches and they just knock him smooth out," John said. "And then he just doesn’t feel like doing anything. And if he does feel like it, his head is hurting so bad that he’s not able to.

"There’s a lot of stuff in your head after you go to war and get blown up that you just can’t throw away. Me, I don’t have a clue because I’ve never been, but I can just imagine. A good friend of mine was a Navy SEAL in Vietnam and he got blown up big-time, and the guy’s got the best attitude of anybody I ever met.

"Jake wasn’t hit for ten minutes and he was on the phone asking: ‘What can I do?’" John said. "We got him cycled through (the recovery process) and once he started getting right, he called me up and said: ‘It’s not the events in your life that matter; it’s what you do with those events. If you want to lie around and be a crybaby, be a crybaby. If you want to jump up and do something…’"
That call made John proud.

"I told him before he left: ‘When you sign (enlistment papers with the Army), I can’t come and get you.’ And he said: ‘I ain’t worried.’ He’s never regretted his decision to go, not at all. He’s never got on the ‘Poor me, I wish I hadn’t’ and stuff like that. We hand him a lot and don’t give him the opportunity to lie around and have his own personal pity party. It’s like: ‘Hey, get up, let’s go do something.’"
Then another curious moment comes along.

"At to the world finals last year, he was sitting up at the top of the coliseum by himself," John recalled. "He just couldn’t stand the confinement of having people all around him. It’s just the little things, like he’ll forget to shut the gate (after riding the horse through)."

The affects also can be seen in Jake’s prolonged moments of silence.

"If we can ever get him to where he’ll just start talking again and intermingling with people and not being paranoid, I think life will be good," John said. "When he’s on horseback or working out, he’s a normal guy. But we’ll be sitting at the house watching TV or something and it ain’t the same guy. We drove six- or seven-hundred miles to the world finals—14 hours of drive time—and he probably said three words.

"But you stick him on a horse or in the gym, where his comfort zone is, and he’s fine."

At age 83, Pete derives inspiration from his injured grandson.
"His motivation is the love for this sport, and that keeps him wanting to get better instead of finding excuses as to why he can’t do something," he said. "He’s finding ways and reasons to do whatever he can. We really don’t worry too much about him, especially when we see how he’s progressing and conducting himself with his injury. He’s just not letting it get him down."

Jake believes that sets him apart from some of his fellow injured troops, whom he says "don’t seem to want to do anything." He couldn’t wait to get active again.

"Some of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation people told me about it when I was at the Warrior Transition Unit," Lowery said of the Wounded Warrior Sports Program. "About two days later, I sent in the paperwork. I sent them about four or five events they could pick from."

"This was the perfect venue for this particular guy," said Army sports specialist Mark Dunivan, who expects more applicants to follow. "I have been contacted by an amputee who wants to run in the USA Triathlon Physically Challenged National Championships in New York in July. I think it’s just a matter of getting the word out a little bit more."

Instructions for the application process to participate in the Wounded Warrior Sports Program are available at www.ArmyMWR.com. For more details, contact Dunivan at mark.dunivan@us.army.mil or 719-526-3908 or Peggy Hutchinson at peggy.hutchinson@us.army.mil or 703-681-7211.

To learn more about the Wounded Warrior Program, visit the U.S. Army online at: www.armymwr.com

In My Bag

by

Check out these inspirational short stories images:

In My Bag
inspirational short stories

Image by shawdm
There was Roo and Ian, then Holly was the final straw. Here’s what I pack into my laptop bag for overseas travel. :-P

Have a good trip all of you. :-)

U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program – Team Roping – 10 May 2008 – Las Cruces – New Mexico – FMWRC
inspirational short stories

Image by familymwr

www.armymwr.com

Cowboy-Soldier Launches Army’s Wounded Warrior Sports Program

Photos and story by Tim Hipps, FMWRC Public Affairs (cleared for public release)

LAS CRUCES, N.M.—Purple Heart recipient Spc. Jake Lowery officially launched the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program with an inspirational team-roping performance at Denny Calhoun Arena on May 10–11.

Lowery, 26, of Fort Richardson, Alaska, lost his right eye and sustained massive head injuries when he was hit by an improvised explosive device that killed a fellow Soldier in Fallujah, Iraq, on Feb. 11, 2007.

Less than a year later, Lowery, a lifelong cowboy, was back aboard a horse and roping steers despite suffering from a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

"This pretty much keeps me going—it’s the only thing that does," he said. "Without it, I’d just be hanging out in my room somewhere."

The Wounded Warrior Sports Program was designed to give active-duty Soldiers with life-altering injuries an opportunity to compete in sporting events by paying for their athletic attire, registration fees, transportation, lodging and per diem.

Lowery travelled from Alaska to El Paso, Texas, and connected with family for a ride home to Silver City, N.M., where he, stepfather John Escobedo and grandfather Pete Escobedo loaded a trailer with horses and drove to Las Cruces for a weekend of roping.

All three competed in the Troy Shelley Affiliate event.

"This is one of the best things the Armed Forces could have done because it’s just therapy for these guys who feel like ‘I lost this. I lost that,’" said Sgt. 1st Class (ret.) Pete Escobedo, 83, who served 27 years in the Army. "If you really want to do something with yourself…Jacob is a prime example. He’s really trying.

"We’re thankful for the Army for doing everything it can for him."

Lowery teamed with different partners to successfully rope two of six steers in the first round of competition on Saturday. After roping two more in the second round and another in the third, he was sitting in third place entering the final short round. But when prize money came into play, his steer got away.

"It looked good to me," Lowery said of his final toss. "I’m not sure how he got out of it. I guess it happens that way sometimes, especially in this sport. Maybe I roped him a little too low. If not, I don’t know."

Despite struggling with limited depth perception, Lowery is encouraged that his roping skills will continue to improve. He already bounced back to win an all-around crown in Alaska and teamed with his stepfather to capture the team-roping title at the Professional Armed Forces Rodeo Association’s 2007 World Finals in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I’m not back to where I was, by any means," Lowery said. "I just keep practicing and hope it eventually comes back."
Lowery’s first run of 8.43 seconds was one of the fastest of the morning among 450 cowboys in Las Cruces. He posted another quality time of 8.69.

"Yeah, it was good, but it could have been better," he said of the full day of roping. "It was awesome just to come down and get out of the cold weather for awhile. I really enjoyed it."

Pete has faith that Jake eventually will overcome TBI and PTSD. Putting him on a horse is the best therapy he knows.

"I have been roping with Jacob since he was knee high to a grasshopper," granddad said. "I just don’t have words to explain the love that we have for Jacob and how much we enjoy ourselves doing what we do. He’s worked very hard. I’m sorry that he had to be injured the way that he was, but we’re doing the best that we can.

"He has taken his injury and forgotten it, to a degree, while he is doing what he loves the most. If you go to our house, this is all you’ll find: horses and cattle. If we’re not roping today, we’re roping tomorrow."

On this weekend, they were roping both days—three generations of cowboys taking turns roping steers in 100-degree desert heat.

"Jake has done remarkably well in coping with his injury," Pete said. "Instead of saying: ‘Well, I’m injured,’ he says: ‘I’m going to do what I can. The Good Lord handed me this hand, so I’m going to do with what he dealt me the best that I can.’"

John, too, is proud of how Jake has dealt with adversity, but he’s also experienced the aftereffects firsthand.

"Sometimes he gets those debilitating headaches and they just knock him smooth out," John said. "And then he just doesn’t feel like doing anything. And if he does feel like it, his head is hurting so bad that he’s not able to.

"There’s a lot of stuff in your head after you go to war and get blown up that you just can’t throw away. Me, I don’t have a clue because I’ve never been, but I can just imagine. A good friend of mine was a Navy SEAL in Vietnam and he got blown up big-time, and the guy’s got the best attitude of anybody I ever met.

"Jake wasn’t hit for ten minutes and he was on the phone asking: ‘What can I do?’" John said. "We got him cycled through (the recovery process) and once he started getting right, he called me up and said: ‘It’s not the events in your life that matter; it’s what you do with those events. If you want to lie around and be a crybaby, be a crybaby. If you want to jump up and do something…’"
That call made John proud.

"I told him before he left: ‘When you sign (enlistment papers with the Army), I can’t come and get you.’ And he said: ‘I ain’t worried.’ He’s never regretted his decision to go, not at all. He’s never got on the ‘Poor me, I wish I hadn’t’ and stuff like that. We hand him a lot and don’t give him the opportunity to lie around and have his own personal pity party. It’s like: ‘Hey, get up, let’s go do something.’"
Then another curious moment comes along.

"At to the world finals last year, he was sitting up at the top of the coliseum by himself," John recalled. "He just couldn’t stand the confinement of having people all around him. It’s just the little things, like he’ll forget to shut the gate (after riding the horse through)."

The affects also can be seen in Jake’s prolonged moments of silence.

"If we can ever get him to where he’ll just start talking again and intermingling with people and not being paranoid, I think life will be good," John said. "When he’s on horseback or working out, he’s a normal guy. But we’ll be sitting at the house watching TV or something and it ain’t the same guy. We drove six- or seven-hundred miles to the world finals—14 hours of drive time—and he probably said three words.

"But you stick him on a horse or in the gym, where his comfort zone is, and he’s fine."

At age 83, Pete derives inspiration from his injured grandson.
"His motivation is the love for this sport, and that keeps him wanting to get better instead of finding excuses as to why he can’t do something," he said. "He’s finding ways and reasons to do whatever he can. We really don’t worry too much about him, especially when we see how he’s progressing and conducting himself with his injury. He’s just not letting it get him down."

Jake believes that sets him apart from some of his fellow injured troops, whom he says "don’t seem to want to do anything." He couldn’t wait to get active again.

"Some of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation people told me about it when I was at the Warrior Transition Unit," Lowery said of the Wounded Warrior Sports Program. "About two days later, I sent in the paperwork. I sent them about four or five events they could pick from."

"This was the perfect venue for this particular guy," said Army sports specialist Mark Dunivan, who expects more applicants to follow. "I have been contacted by an amputee who wants to run in the USA Triathlon Physically Challenged National Championships in New York in July. I think it’s just a matter of getting the word out a little bit more."

Instructions for the application process to participate in the Wounded Warrior Sports Program are available at www.ArmyMWR.com. For more details, contact Dunivan at mark.dunivan@us.army.mil or 719-526-3908 or Peggy Hutchinson at peggy.hutchinson@us.army.mil or 703-681-7211.

To learn more about the Wounded Warrior Program, visit the U.S. Army online at: www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program – Team Roping – 10 May 2008 – Las Cruces – New Mexico – FMWRC
inspirational short stories

Image by familymwr

www.armymwr.com

Cowboy-Soldier Launches Army’s Wounded Warrior Sports Program

Photos and story by Tim Hipps, FMWRC Public Affairs (cleared for public release)

LAS CRUCES, N.M.—Purple Heart recipient Spc. Jake Lowery officially launched the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program with an inspirational team-roping performance at Denny Calhoun Arena on May 10–11.

Lowery, 26, of Fort Richardson, Alaska, lost his right eye and sustained massive head injuries when he was hit by an improvised explosive device that killed a fellow Soldier in Fallujah, Iraq, on Feb. 11, 2007.

Less than a year later, Lowery, a lifelong cowboy, was back aboard a horse and roping steers despite suffering from a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

"This pretty much keeps me going—it’s the only thing that does," he said. "Without it, I’d just be hanging out in my room somewhere."

The Wounded Warrior Sports Program was designed to give active-duty Soldiers with life-altering injuries an opportunity to compete in sporting events by paying for their athletic attire, registration fees, transportation, lodging and per diem.

Lowery travelled from Alaska to El Paso, Texas, and connected with family for a ride home to Silver City, N.M., where he, stepfather John Escobedo and grandfather Pete Escobedo loaded a trailer with horses and drove to Las Cruces for a weekend of roping.

All three competed in the Troy Shelley Affiliate event.

"This is one of the best things the Armed Forces could have done because it’s just therapy for these guys who feel like ‘I lost this. I lost that,’" said Sgt. 1st Class (ret.) Pete Escobedo, 83, who served 27 years in the Army. "If you really want to do something with yourself…Jacob is a prime example. He’s really trying.

"We’re thankful for the Army for doing everything it can for him."

Lowery teamed with different partners to successfully rope two of six steers in the first round of competition on Saturday. After roping two more in the second round and another in the third, he was sitting in third place entering the final short round. But when prize money came into play, his steer got away.

"It looked good to me," Lowery said of his final toss. "I’m not sure how he got out of it. I guess it happens that way sometimes, especially in this sport. Maybe I roped him a little too low. If not, I don’t know."

Despite struggling with limited depth perception, Lowery is encouraged that his roping skills will continue to improve. He already bounced back to win an all-around crown in Alaska and teamed with his stepfather to capture the team-roping title at the Professional Armed Forces Rodeo Association’s 2007 World Finals in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I’m not back to where I was, by any means," Lowery said. "I just keep practicing and hope it eventually comes back."
Lowery’s first run of 8.43 seconds was one of the fastest of the morning among 450 cowboys in Las Cruces. He posted another quality time of 8.69.

"Yeah, it was good, but it could have been better," he said of the full day of roping. "It was awesome just to come down and get out of the cold weather for awhile. I really enjoyed it."

Pete has faith that Jake eventually will overcome TBI and PTSD. Putting him on a horse is the best therapy he knows.

"I have been roping with Jacob since he was knee high to a grasshopper," granddad said. "I just don’t have words to explain the love that we have for Jacob and how much we enjoy ourselves doing what we do. He’s worked very hard. I’m sorry that he had to be injured the way that he was, but we’re doing the best that we can.

"He has taken his injury and forgotten it, to a degree, while he is doing what he loves the most. If you go to our house, this is all you’ll find: horses and cattle. If we’re not roping today, we’re roping tomorrow."

On this weekend, they were roping both days—three generations of cowboys taking turns roping steers in 100-degree desert heat.

"Jake has done remarkably well in coping with his injury," Pete said. "Instead of saying: ‘Well, I’m injured,’ he says: ‘I’m going to do what I can. The Good Lord handed me this hand, so I’m going to do with what he dealt me the best that I can.’"

John, too, is proud of how Jake has dealt with adversity, but he’s also experienced the aftereffects firsthand.

"Sometimes he gets those debilitating headaches and they just knock him smooth out," John said. "And then he just doesn’t feel like doing anything. And if he does feel like it, his head is hurting so bad that he’s not able to.

"There’s a lot of stuff in your head after you go to war and get blown up that you just can’t throw away. Me, I don’t have a clue because I’ve never been, but I can just imagine. A good friend of mine was a Navy SEAL in Vietnam and he got blown up big-time, and the guy’s got the best attitude of anybody I ever met.

"Jake wasn’t hit for ten minutes and he was on the phone asking: ‘What can I do?’" John said. "We got him cycled through (the recovery process) and once he started getting right, he called me up and said: ‘It’s not the events in your life that matter; it’s what you do with those events. If you want to lie around and be a crybaby, be a crybaby. If you want to jump up and do something…’"
That call made John proud.

"I told him before he left: ‘When you sign (enlistment papers with the Army), I can’t come and get you.’ And he said: ‘I ain’t worried.’ He’s never regretted his decision to go, not at all. He’s never got on the ‘Poor me, I wish I hadn’t’ and stuff like that. We hand him a lot and don’t give him the opportunity to lie around and have his own personal pity party. It’s like: ‘Hey, get up, let’s go do something.’"
Then another curious moment comes along.

"At to the world finals last year, he was sitting up at the top of the coliseum by himself," John recalled. "He just couldn’t stand the confinement of having people all around him. It’s just the little things, like he’ll forget to shut the gate (after riding the horse through)."

The affects also can be seen in Jake’s prolonged moments of silence.

"If we can ever get him to where he’ll just start talking again and intermingling with people and not being paranoid, I think life will be good," John said. "When he’s on horseback or working out, he’s a normal guy. But we’ll be sitting at the house watching TV or something and it ain’t the same guy. We drove six- or seven-hundred miles to the world finals—14 hours of drive time—and he probably said three words.

"But you stick him on a horse or in the gym, where his comfort zone is, and he’s fine."

At age 83, Pete derives inspiration from his injured grandson.
"His motivation is the love for this sport, and that keeps him wanting to get better instead of finding excuses as to why he can’t do something," he said. "He’s finding ways and reasons to do whatever he can. We really don’t worry too much about him, especially when we see how he’s progressing and conducting himself with his injury. He’s just not letting it get him down."

Jake believes that sets him apart from some of his fellow injured troops, whom he says "don’t seem to want to do anything." He couldn’t wait to get active again.

"Some of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation people told me about it when I was at the Warrior Transition Unit," Lowery said of the Wounded Warrior Sports Program. "About two days later, I sent in the paperwork. I sent them about four or five events they could pick from."

"This was the perfect venue for this particular guy," said Army sports specialist Mark Dunivan, who expects more applicants to follow. "I have been contacted by an amputee who wants to run in the USA Triathlon Physically Challenged National Championships in New York in July. I think it’s just a matter of getting the word out a little bit more."

Instructions for the application process to participate in the Wounded Warrior Sports Program are available at www.ArmyMWR.com. For more details, contact Dunivan at mark.dunivan@us.army.mil or 719-526-3908 or Peggy Hutchinson at peggy.hutchinson@us.army.mil or 703-681-7211.

To learn more about the Wounded Warrior Program, visit the U.S. Army online at: www.armymwr.com

Do short story collections sell?

by

Question by Kristen: Do short story collections sell?
I was thinking of writing a collection of short stories since I have trouble sticking to one idea long enough to write a whole novel about one set of characters but I was wondering if short story collections sell or not. Most likely it will be young adult stories, though since that’s what I read and like to write about.

Best answer:

Answer by Angel C
Short stories do sell but you have to have a certain theme. The most popular is Inspirational themes. They sell to books like Chicken Soup. But you can’t make a living off of short stories. If you can write a short story, you can write a book. Just do your outline and think of each chapter as a short story.

Give your answer to this question below!

Reflections On Life: A Collection of Christian and Inspirational Short Stories

by

Reflections On Life: A Collection of Christian and Inspirational Short Stories

Reflections On Life: A Collection of Christian and Inspirational Short Stories

In this thought-provoking Christian book, Reflections on Life, Staci opens her heart and shares with the reader the Anointed words God has given her to write.

Find the power of prayer, faith, hope, and joy found in everyday life as you walk the Christian journey with Jesus at your side. These stories–part devotional – part practical lessons will

compel you to

—look at each challenge in life as an opportunity to observe a miracle

encourage you to

Price:

Inspirational Stories for Children ? in conjunction with bedtime stories.

by

‘Anytime stories’ are invaluable in the early development and learning cycle of a child. Exposing a child to meaningful stories has proven over time to be one of the best skill sharpening tools. A child needs to be taught how to think and what better way than to read them a thought provoking story. The story of ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ for instance, which incidentally is still ranked number one in fairy tales, will help a child to understand and think about obedience, trust, and deceit. These attributes can be pursued and discussed in depth, to give a child a deeper insight to their meaning.

When a parent randomly chooses a time to read a story to their child it has numerous positive results. Being in close proximity of the child both physically and psychologically will instill a sense of love and bonding. When children learn to love books, it becomes part of them. Their engagement becomes their hobby. Parents can use random reading to introduce children to villains of the real world. Reading a story from a newspaper or magazine about current affairs helps prepare children for and to accept some of the day to day events and dangers.. A carefully selected story challenges and engages a child’s mind, which would fuel their curiosity about more real subjects and consequently build a broad knowledge base.

Reading with a child helps the child connect printed words and meaning and reading out loud will demonstrate what good reading sounds like and provide a goal for their own literary skills. Reading a variety of stories helps children learn how story structure and narrative work which will help in literacy as well as social interaction Good Inspirational stories will boost a child’s IQ and teach them useful life lessons. All humans are connected to one another through stories.

As children grow older they can be introduced to more complex stories and discussions around associations, ethics, benefits, qualities and a host of other characteristics can be initiated. It may even be a good time to revisit the golden old fairy tales and take a more comprehensive look at their content. As we grow older we read more into different situations and the story of the Three little Pigs and others take on a whole new meaning.

By the time children start reading by themselves they should be able to, easily, differentiate between good writing and drivel. There are many good authors whose vocabularies are good enough to refrain from using profanities and vulgar language to convey a message. Unfortunately there is also some real smut to which children should not be prematurely exposed.

Now that you have been inspired to read to your children, it is time to start dusting off those books crammed away in your child’s toy filled room and crack it open and transport them into a Magical and Educational World.

Enjoy.

Monique Morgan works from home as a internet marketer. She does website testing and enjoys writing articles. She is pedantic about her research and tries to give the best content she can both in her articles and the products that she markets. Monique enjoys outdoor life, bird-watching and exploring remote natural areas.

She is also a huge bookworm and never without a book by her side.The mere thought of not having my nose poked into a great book is scary. Many nights I fall asleep with my book on my chest. If only people would know what joy one experiences with reading, everyone  would do it.

 

Find out more about inspirational stories

More Inspirational Short Stories Articles

Inspirational Stories for Children ? in conjunction with bedtime stories.

by

‘Anytime stories’ are invaluable in the early development and learning cycle of a child. Exposing a child to meaningful stories has proven over time to be one of the best skill sharpening tools. A child needs to be taught how to think and what better way than to read them a thought provoking story. The story of ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ for instance, which incidentally is still ranked number one in fairy tales, will help a child to understand and think about obedience, trust, and deceit. These attributes can be pursued and discussed in depth, to give a child a deeper insight to their meaning.

When a parent randomly chooses a time to read a story to their child it has numerous positive results. Being in close proximity of the child both physically and psychologically will instill a sense of love and bonding. When children learn to love books, it becomes part of them. Their engagement becomes their hobby. Parents can use random reading to introduce children to villains of the real world. Reading a story from a newspaper or magazine about current affairs helps prepare children for and to accept some of the day to day events and dangers.. A carefully selected story challenges and engages a child’s mind, which would fuel their curiosity about more real subjects and consequently build a broad knowledge base.

Reading with a child helps the child connect printed words and meaning and reading out loud will demonstrate what good reading sounds like and provide a goal for their own literary skills. Reading a variety of stories helps children learn how story structure and narrative work which will help in literacy as well as social interaction Good Inspirational stories will boost a child’s IQ and teach them useful life lessons. All humans are connected to one another through stories.

As children grow older they can be introduced to more complex stories and discussions around associations, ethics, benefits, qualities and a host of other characteristics can be initiated. It may even be a good time to revisit the golden old fairy tales and take a more comprehensive look at their content. As we grow older we read more into different situations and the story of the Three little Pigs and others take on a whole new meaning.

By the time children start reading by themselves they should be able to, easily, differentiate between good writing and drivel. There are many good authors whose vocabularies are good enough to refrain from using profanities and vulgar language to convey a message. Unfortunately there is also some real smut to which children should not be prematurely exposed.

Now that you have been inspired to read to your children, it is time to start dusting off those books crammed away in your child’s toy filled room and crack it open and transport them into a Magical and Educational World.

Enjoy.

Monique Morgan works from home as a internet marketer. She does website testing and enjoys writing articles. She is pedantic about her research and tries to give the best content she can both in her articles and the products that she markets. Monique enjoys outdoor life, bird-watching and exploring remote natural areas.

She is also a huge bookworm and never without a book by her side.The mere thought of not having my nose poked into a great book is scary. Many nights I fall asleep with my book on my chest. If only people would know what joy one experiences with reading, everyone  would do it.

 

Find out more about inspirational stories

Nothing But A Miracle (Life’s Outtakes – Year 4) 52 Humorous and Inspirational Short Stories

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Nothing But A Miracle (Life’s Outtakes – Year 4) 52 Humorous and Inspirational Short Stories

Nothing But A Miracle (Life's Outtakes - Year 4) 52 Humorous and Inspirational Short Stories

52 Humorous And Inspirational Short Stories! – Life’s Outtakes Volume 4From the inspiration of a Christmas miracle in Nothing But A Miracle to the humor of A Journal Of A Gardener At Harvest Time, these 52 humorous and inspirational short stories (one for each week of the year) will make you laugh, reminisce, and contemplate the relationships you cherish most. Stories include:

Trying To Outsmart The Corn BanditsJournal Of A Gardner At Harvest TimeTo Catch A RaccoonTo Catch A CheaterWho

Price:

Taste BerriesTM for Teens : Inspirational Short Stories and Encouragement on...

$1.85
End Date: Thursday Oct-23-2014 7:56:35 PDT
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Thank God I...Volume 3: Short STories of Inspiration for Every Situation
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Find More Inspirational Short Stories Products

WR Steve Smith signs 3-year deal with Ravens

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U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program – Team Roping – 10 May 2008 – Las Cruces – New Mexico – FMWRC
inspirational short stories

Image by familymwr

www.armymwr.com

Cowboy-Soldier Launches Army’s Wounded Warrior Sports Program

Photos and story by Tim Hipps, FMWRC Public Affairs (cleared for public release)

LAS CRUCES, N.M.—Purple Heart recipient Spc. Jake Lowery officially launched the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program with an inspirational team-roping performance at Denny Calhoun Arena on May 10–11.

Lowery, 26, of Fort Richardson, Alaska, lost his right eye and sustained massive head injuries when he was hit by an improvised explosive device that killed a fellow Soldier in Fallujah, Iraq, on Feb. 11, 2007.

Less than a year later, Lowery, a lifelong cowboy, was back aboard a horse and roping steers despite suffering from a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

"This pretty much keeps me going—it’s the only thing that does," he said. "Without it, I’d just be hanging out in my room somewhere."

The Wounded Warrior Sports Program was designed to give active-duty Soldiers with life-altering injuries an opportunity to compete in sporting events by paying for their athletic attire, registration fees, transportation, lodging and per diem.

Lowery travelled from Alaska to El Paso, Texas, and connected with family for a ride home to Silver City, N.M., where he, stepfather John Escobedo and grandfather Pete Escobedo loaded a trailer with horses and drove to Las Cruces for a weekend of roping.

All three competed in the Troy Shelley Affiliate event.

"This is one of the best things the Armed Forces could have done because it’s just therapy for these guys who feel like ‘I lost this. I lost that,’" said Sgt. 1st Class (ret.) Pete Escobedo, 83, who served 27 years in the Army. "If you really want to do something with yourself…Jacob is a prime example. He’s really trying.

"We’re thankful for the Army for doing everything it can for him."

Lowery teamed with different partners to successfully rope two of six steers in the first round of competition on Saturday. After roping two more in the second round and another in the third, he was sitting in third place entering the final short round. But when prize money came into play, his steer got away.

"It looked good to me," Lowery said of his final toss. "I’m not sure how he got out of it. I guess it happens that way sometimes, especially in this sport. Maybe I roped him a little too low. If not, I don’t know."

Despite struggling with limited depth perception, Lowery is encouraged that his roping skills will continue to improve. He already bounced back to win an all-around crown in Alaska and teamed with his stepfather to capture the team-roping title at the Professional Armed Forces Rodeo Association’s 2007 World Finals in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I’m not back to where I was, by any means," Lowery said. "I just keep practicing and hope it eventually comes back."
Lowery’s first run of 8.43 seconds was one of the fastest of the morning among 450 cowboys in Las Cruces. He posted another quality time of 8.69.

"Yeah, it was good, but it could have been better," he said of the full day of roping. "It was awesome just to come down and get out of the cold weather for awhile. I really enjoyed it."

Pete has faith that Jake eventually will overcome TBI and PTSD. Putting him on a horse is the best therapy he knows.

"I have been roping with Jacob since he was knee high to a grasshopper," granddad said. "I just don’t have words to explain the love that we have for Jacob and how much we enjoy ourselves doing what we do. He’s worked very hard. I’m sorry that he had to be injured the way that he was, but we’re doing the best that we can.

"He has taken his injury and forgotten it, to a degree, while he is doing what he loves the most. If you go to our house, this is all you’ll find: horses and cattle. If we’re not roping today, we’re roping tomorrow."

On this weekend, they were roping both days—three generations of cowboys taking turns roping steers in 100-degree desert heat.

"Jake has done remarkably well in coping with his injury," Pete said. "Instead of saying: ‘Well, I’m injured,’ he says: ‘I’m going to do what I can. The Good Lord handed me this hand, so I’m going to do with what he dealt me the best that I can.’"

John, too, is proud of how Jake has dealt with adversity, but he’s also experienced the aftereffects firsthand.

"Sometimes he gets those debilitating headaches and they just knock him smooth out," John said. "And then he just doesn’t feel like doing anything. And if he does feel like it, his head is hurting so bad that he’s not able to.

"There’s a lot of stuff in your head after you go to war and get blown up that you just can’t throw away. Me, I don’t have a clue because I’ve never been, but I can just imagine. A good friend of mine was a Navy SEAL in Vietnam and he got blown up big-time, and the guy’s got the best attitude of anybody I ever met.

"Jake wasn’t hit for ten minutes and he was on the phone asking: ‘What can I do?’" John said. "We got him cycled through (the recovery process) and once he started getting right, he called me up and said: ‘It’s not the events in your life that matter; it’s what you do with those events. If you want to lie around and be a crybaby, be a crybaby. If you want to jump up and do something…’"
That call made John proud.

"I told him before he left: ‘When you sign (enlistment papers with the Army), I can’t come and get you.’ And he said: ‘I ain’t worried.’ He’s never regretted his decision to go, not at all. He’s never got on the ‘Poor me, I wish I hadn’t’ and stuff like that. We hand him a lot and don’t give him the opportunity to lie around and have his own personal pity party. It’s like: ‘Hey, get up, let’s go do something.’"
Then another curious moment comes along.

"At to the world finals last year, he was sitting up at the top of the coliseum by himself," John recalled. "He just couldn’t stand the confinement of having people all around him. It’s just the little things, like he’ll forget to shut the gate (after riding the horse through)."

The affects also can be seen in Jake’s prolonged moments of silence.

"If we can ever get him to where he’ll just start talking again and intermingling with people and not being paranoid, I think life will be good," John said. "When he’s on horseback or working out, he’s a normal guy. But we’ll be sitting at the house watching TV or something and it ain’t the same guy. We drove six- or seven-hundred miles to the world finals—14 hours of drive time—and he probably said three words.

"But you stick him on a horse or in the gym, where his comfort zone is, and he’s fine."

At age 83, Pete derives inspiration from his injured grandson.
"His motivation is the love for this sport, and that keeps him wanting to get better instead of finding excuses as to why he can’t do something," he said. "He’s finding ways and reasons to do whatever he can. We really don’t worry too much about him, especially when we see how he’s progressing and conducting himself with his injury. He’s just not letting it get him down."

Jake believes that sets him apart from some of his fellow injured troops, whom he says "don’t seem to want to do anything." He couldn’t wait to get active again.

"Some of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation people told me about it when I was at the Warrior Transition Unit," Lowery said of the Wounded Warrior Sports Program. "About two days later, I sent in the paperwork. I sent them about four or five events they could pick from."

"This was the perfect venue for this particular guy," said Army sports specialist Mark Dunivan, who expects more applicants to follow. "I have been contacted by an amputee who wants to run in the USA Triathlon Physically Challenged National Championships in New York in July. I think it’s just a matter of getting the word out a little bit more."

Instructions for the application process to participate in the Wounded Warrior Sports Program are available at www.ArmyMWR.com. For more details, contact Dunivan at mark.dunivan@us.army.mil or 719-526-3908 or Peggy Hutchinson at peggy.hutchinson@us.army.mil or 703-681-7211.

To learn more about the Wounded Warrior Program, visit the U.S. Army online at: www.armymwr.com

WR Steve Smith signs 3-year deal with Ravens
SHARECONNECT 13 TWEETCOMMENTEMAILMORE. Steve Smith is eager to continue his NFL career in Baltimore, where he's just a short flight from his permanent home in Charlotte. The longtime Panthers standout wide receiver didn't waste time finding a …
Read more on USA TODAY

First Contact: A Short Story
The two astronomers were stealthily stalking a small group of wildebeest on the African Savanna while taking a break from their research. One of the magnificent but twitchy bulls seemed on edge and sensed that something was amiss. Perhaps it had caught …
Read more on Huffington Post

Pet Tales: Novel ways to love dogs
Animals are important characters in many of Ms. Hempel's short stories, including "In the Animal Shelter" and "At the Gates of the Animal Kingdom." A wife who is losing her husband to another woman in "The Dog of the Marriage" works as a dog trainer at …
Read more on Pittsburgh Post Gazette

Q&A: Do short story collections sell?

by

Question by Kristen: Do short story collections sell?
I was thinking of writing a collection of short stories since I have trouble sticking to one idea long enough to write a whole novel about one set of characters but I was wondering if short story collections sell or not. Most likely it will be young adult stories, though since that’s what I read and like to write about.

Best answer:

Answer by Angel C
Short stories do sell but you have to have a certain theme. The most popular is Inspirational themes. They sell to books like Chicken Soup. But you can’t make a living off of short stories. If you can write a short story, you can write a book. Just do your outline and think of each chapter as a short story.

Give your answer to this question below!